Futuristic Society of Fahrenheit 451

Futuristic Society of Fahrenheit 451

Bradbury uses symbolism to pass his message to the readers about the future of our society. In his Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury uses symbolism of burning the books, watching television, listening to radios, and the ban of reading books. Montag society has no interest in reading since reading is prohibited and the books are set on fire when anybody is found reading them.

According to Bradbury, censorship was the use of technology. In Bradbury Fahrenheit 451, the modern society is popular with competing types of entertainment such as Television and radio. The Montag town listened to radio and watched television only. “Without turning on the light he could imagine how his room would look, his wife stretched on the bed…in her ears the little seashells, thimble radios…electronic ocean sound of music” (Bradbury 12). This censorship shows the rate at which technology has advanced and become powerful as well as how people have become lazy.

[place-order]

Censorship is also portrayed through the act of burning the books. Reading a book was prohibited by law. Homes having books were burnt. Burning books shows that the entire society is living in total darkness. The society remains equal without books knowledge. However, technological power has overthrown the importance of books in the society. Only a few people research from library books. Today, they search on internet and get the information they want. In case a person desired to read a set of books, online options to purchase such as Nook and Kindles are there.

In his Fahrenheit 451 book, Bradbury is against censorship. Bradbury highlights how adverse censorship is to the society. Montag realises that the burning of books must stop and starts to steal and read books himself. Reading books give people knowledge. Finally, Bradbury captures readers attention by conveying what the society would become if technology is allowed to control the society.

Work Cited

Bradbury, Ray. “Fahrenheit 451. 1950.” New York: Ballantine (1962): 1-19.

Leave a Reply